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Selling a Horse? Look Out for Scammers

I confess to being amazed at the change in the horse market over the past several years. It used to be that you posted a print ad and produced a video and folks would call you to ask lots of questions about your beautiful horse and if you felt them to be a serious prospective buyer ( or even if you didn't) you'd send them a copy of the video.

After receipt of same the buyer would generally either call or return the video with a note saying whether or not they were interested.

With the arrival of the internet, website and social media the market has certainly changed. I believe the availability of free information on a horse you have for sale to a massive audience is helpful overall. But unfortunately with it comes a lot more than just tire kickers.

Video of Gambol's Genevieve: For Sale Currently $5000.00 Price will increase once under saddle.

A few experiences from the past two months:

A named Young Rider located in Texas contacts me online through Facebook and asks for inform…
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